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Happy Tummy, happy Calgary

While a majority of charity funds hope to raise enough money to benefit a cause, Happy Tummy Calgary is raising awareness of an ever growing problem.

“Happy Tummy Calgary is a group of young students who donate money into a fund every week, 2 weeks or even every month that stems as a small contribution to a future project plan, says Akimo Creasey, head of Happy Tummy Calgary.

“Happy Tummy’s main projects include: feeding the homeless and RKOB which we call ‘Random Kindness on a Budget,’” Creasy mentions.

Homelessness and poverty is often viewed as a problem with no end in sight.

“The Idea of Happy Tummy started when I was in my basement watching prank videos and my room-mate said ‘we should pretend to hand out free pizza covered with bugs’ as a prank,” Creasy says.

“Then we thought about how cruel it would be to do it to people who would actually enjoy a slice of pizza (such as The Drop-In Centre or The Mustard Seed), so we decided that everyone has to eat, so we will raise money to feed people in need,” Creasy says.

The fact that a great idea can come out of something a prank goes to show that people are kind at heart.

“Now is a great time to start because no matter how little the donation, the future will show that through collections over weeks and months the sum would be fat enough to really treat some people to nice warm meals,” Creasy states.

“As long as the dream stays true, this will not only be annual but might turn into a thing where certain events will happen,” Creasy says.

“Where you will see us, 420? No problem we got free munchies,” Creasy jokingly says.

“I think in terms of promoting, word of mouth is the best value,” Creasy mentions.

Akimo Creasey sees no end in sight for his vision. He hopes that everyone in Calgary will jump in on his cause.

“My goal is to show people that you don’t have to be Religious to give, you don’t have to be in the right place at the right time,” Creasy says.

“If you put your mind on it, it just happens and we are all capable of spreading happiness,” Creasy adds.

“Everyone loves food,” he lastly shares.

If you wanna make a donation, send an email to HappyTummyCalgary@gmail.com, as little as $1 will help fuel the cause.

 

Akimo Creasey Happy Tummy

Risky Endeavor: The Multimedia

Cale Zebedee, upcoming rock and roll God, is front man bass player for the band “Risky Endeavor.”

In September he sat down with me for an interview to share insights of his band and their plans for new material, rocking the stage, and having a good time playing rock and roll music.

The article was published in SAIT’s The Press online and print newspaper publication:

http://saitjournalism.ca/thepress/2013/09/23/getting-a-little-risky-with-cale-zebedee/

Cale Zebedee in Photo:

Cale Zebedee Article Pics

Risky Endeavor, Trace The Sky, Sharks! On Fire! Old Towns

Risky Endeavor, Trace The Sky, Sharks! On Fire! Old Towns

Their music is catchy and raw, full of old school punk rock feel and new age rock music.

For a sound unlike any other, the link below offers an insight into who Risky Endeavor is:

The band is frequently posting new content on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/RiskyEndeavor

You can get to know them a little better:

https://www.facebook.com/risky.endeavor.1?fref=ts

 

Risky Endeavor, Trace The Sky, Sharks! On Fire! Old Towns

And their tunes are often circulating the ‘net:

https://soundcloud.com/riskyendeavor

Risky Endeavor, Trace The Sky, Sharks! On Fire! Old Towns

Inside A City Of Bridges

Robert Albus, A.K.A. Rob Jungle, A.K.A. A City of Bridges, is a young up-and-coming musical mastermind who dabbles in the indie electronic scene brewing in the cold winter heart of Calgary.

“My name is my music,” says ACOB.

“I am A City Of Bridges,” he adds.

To Rob, music is much more than most of us can comprehend.

“My name is the feeling you get when a song hits you in the feels,” he touches on.

“Maybe that’s a little inexplicable for most to understand, but it’s how I view myself,” he shares.

Rob has become accustomed to the soothing sounds of Fruity Loops Studio (FL) and shares his work throughout the social media scope.

“I make all sorts of electronic music but it’s all some common elements,” he shares.

“I like to use self-recorded sounds of things like twigs breaking, rocks hitting rocks, crunchy leaves and the sort for my percussion. There’s a lot of subtractive synthesis in my work and I’ve been branching into additive synthesis and FM synthesis, he says.

“Convolution reverb is another large theme for A City Of Bridges. Imagine clapping in a parkade: the tail of this reverberation can be processed in such a way that I can place my synthesized and self-recorded sounds into this acoustic space,” he explains.

But how does a musician deal with the task of trying to sort his thought process without interference or distraction from everyone else’s work?

“I listen to little music day to day at the moment. My tastes, however, have been developed over years which have been filled with great periods of active listening (the practice of listening to a piece of music as a sole activity rather than using it accompany other tasks),” he says.

I enjoy everything from big band and swing to acid and improvisational jazz. Anything folky speaks to my heart and reminds me of the fact that I AM nature, not IN nature,” he shares passionately.

“I love to throw my hood up and vibe to hip hop – new school or old school and basically anything bass-heavy in the electronic realm is A-OK to me,” he says.

“But my soul resonates with deep, atmospheric, dubby, grimy, slow jams,” he shares.

“I also like to dance like a motherfu**er so it’s important to know what’s appropriate,” he says.

Rob’s interest in electronic music dates back to the prepubescent ages of every man’s time to grow.

“I started making electronic music when I was in high school,” he says.

“I met a fellow who was a DJ and he taught me a few things. I thought it was fun, but I wanted to create music, not just play it,” he says with soul.

“I spent years learning the art and to this day I am still learning, he adds.

“The key is to do it every single day and allocate the time and money that is needed to do this,” he says.

Rob has been associated under a variety of names, but A City Of Bridges is a creature of a different realm.

“A City Of Bridges started autumn 2012. I went through a rough breakup and lost my mind a little and I went to my home town to see my ailing grandmother in the hospital,” he says.

“This lovely small city is known affectionately as The City Of Bridges. It all came together,” he shares.

“I knew that I had to dedicate myself to my art at a whole new level and in a way that I didn’t know I could previously,” he says.

“Since then, I have had a release, an EP entitled GSD https://soundcloud.com/acityofbridges/sets/gsd,”

A City of Bridges isn’t hitting the breaks anytime soon.

“I have a lead on a label release but it’s all unofficial still,” he says.

“It’d be a first for me and it is certainly the next step in my career,” he adds.

Whether it’s writing music, DJing, or simply finding the time to garden while rocking out to his beats (no pun intended), A City of Bridges will find his place in the modern world.

“Being a performance artist of some sort is a part of where I see my career going, but ultimately I identify as a maker,” he says with ferocity.

“For the time being I make music and coming up soon I will be making performance hardware from recycled and antiquated mediums. Wherever I end up, it will be music and it will be focused on making,” he adds.

“My music is my life and all I really want to see are people feeling what I’m feeling when I write my music,” he says.

“The rest we’ll have to wait and find out,” he shares lastly.

Bless up!

ACO Bridges

For additional coverage, click here:

http://storify.com/Dylan_Streifel/inside-a-city-of-bridges

Downtown Shoot