Sled Island 2014: becoming a reality

Sled Island is an independent multi-venue music and arts festival that takes place each year in Calgary at the end of June.

“Each edition presents over 250 bands alongside a selection of films, comedians and visual artists,” says Maud Salvi, executive director of the event.

“Sled Island’s mission is to support, showcase and create opportunities for local musicians and to bring the best of independent art and music to Calgary, as well as to educate people about forms of music and art that are underrepresented or totally absent in mainstream media,” Maud Salvi adds.

Sled Island is a festival that was created in 2007 by Zak Pashak, a music, arts, and entertainment hub dedicated to providing an exciting festival for Calgarians and festival goers alike.

“We officially announced we will be back June 18 to 22, 2014,” says Maud Salvi.

“Right now the bulk of the work involves grant writing and finding sponsors for the upcoming edition, securing venues, developing our marketing plan and we also just opened artist submissions and are starting to work on programming,” Maud Salvi adds.

Because of the floods that hit most of southern Alberta including Calgary, the event was shut down this summer.

“It has been a setback even though we have been very lucky and largely supported by our community,” says Maud Salvi.

“The 2013 edition was going to be the best so far,” says Maud Salvi.

“Tickets and passes sales were really good and we were hoping to break even this time and maybe make a bit of a profit,” says Maud Salvi.

“Financially we are pretty much back to 0 now which means there isn’t room for risk taking or expansion in 2014, Maud Salvi states.

Ticket holders were given the option to either take a refund or put their money towards rebuilding the 2014 edition of Sled Island.

“We gave them all the option to either ask for a refund or invest in the future of the festival by letting us keep the money and 70% of them chose to forgo their refund, says Maud Salvi.

With regards to funding the city’s arts community, there is always going to be support in some way.

“I don’t think that I’ve lived here long enough to speak about the City’s commitment to the entire arts community but the Calgary Arts Development Authority (CADA), that receives most of its revenue from the City and distribute them through granting programs, have been a big supporter of the festival for many years,” Maud Salvi says.

Advertisements

Happy Tummy, happy Calgary

While a majority of charity funds hope to raise enough money to benefit a cause, Happy Tummy Calgary is raising awareness of an ever growing problem.

“Happy Tummy Calgary is a group of young students who donate money into a fund every week, 2 weeks or even every month that stems as a small contribution to a future project plan, says Akimo Creasey, head of Happy Tummy Calgary.

“Happy Tummy’s main projects include: feeding the homeless and RKOB which we call ‘Random Kindness on a Budget,’” Creasy mentions.

Homelessness and poverty is often viewed as a problem with no end in sight.

“The Idea of Happy Tummy started when I was in my basement watching prank videos and my room-mate said ‘we should pretend to hand out free pizza covered with bugs’ as a prank,” Creasy says.

“Then we thought about how cruel it would be to do it to people who would actually enjoy a slice of pizza (such as The Drop-In Centre or The Mustard Seed), so we decided that everyone has to eat, so we will raise money to feed people in need,” Creasy says.

The fact that a great idea can come out of something a prank goes to show that people are kind at heart.

“Now is a great time to start because no matter how little the donation, the future will show that through collections over weeks and months the sum would be fat enough to really treat some people to nice warm meals,” Creasy states.

“As long as the dream stays true, this will not only be annual but might turn into a thing where certain events will happen,” Creasy says.

“Where you will see us, 420? No problem we got free munchies,” Creasy jokingly says.

“I think in terms of promoting, word of mouth is the best value,” Creasy mentions.

Akimo Creasey sees no end in sight for his vision. He hopes that everyone in Calgary will jump in on his cause.

“My goal is to show people that you don’t have to be Religious to give, you don’t have to be in the right place at the right time,” Creasy says.

“If you put your mind on it, it just happens and we are all capable of spreading happiness,” Creasy adds.

“Everyone loves food,” he lastly shares.

If you wanna make a donation, send an email to HappyTummyCalgary@gmail.com, as little as $1 will help fuel the cause.

 

Akimo Creasey Happy Tummy

How Artfully Artless is crafting death back to life

Artfully Artless is an independent business based out of Calgary, Alberta run by ACAD art student Amanda West.

“Artfully Artless began in August of 2013 with a few insect specimens and some bones being the first listings in the shop,” says Amanda West.

Bugs, bones, jewels and stones are just a few of the arsenal this creative soul uses to recreate artistry through the imaginative use of cruelty free insects for crafts.

“I first opened the shop in 2011 but I never listed anything,” says West.

“After a few years of scavenging and gathering parts, I found last summer that my impulsive collection of deceased critters was getting out of hand, and I was running out of space for all of it,” West adds.

Amanda uses cruelty-free insects harvested from local farmers/picked herself/etc. for use in her jewellery.

“It’s more of a way of living for me,” West says.

“I don’t kill thing nor do I let my family kill things in the house or in my presence,” West mentions.

“I would not buy something killed for the sake of art, so I would not sell something that is killed for the sake of [it]” West says.

So the idea came to fruition to take the form of death and bring it back to life.

“Perhaps someone would appreciate my bugs as much as I did,” says West.

Amanda has always been known throughout the city for her innovative and awe-inspiring artwork.

“I still study at ACAD actually,” says West.

“It’s fantastic being surrounded by other artists with all sorts of styles and means of inspiring,” West adds.

“I can honestly say I never thought I’d grow as much as a creator,” says West.

To create something that was once living and give it a new breadth of life is a skill most of us are drawn to but wouldn’t have the urge to attempt.

“Almost everything I make incorporates nature in some way,” says West.

“Nature is beautiful in its living form and even after it passes on, there is this sort of shell that remains,” West adds.

“The animals that I get my bones from have either died naturally, or have been taken by the road, by hunters, by hitting windows, or have been killed by other animals,” West says.

“I’d rather remember them, and honour them, than bury them and forget,” West says.

While Artfully Artless is picking up success online, Amanda sees a bright future for the business.

“Artfully Artless is a brand that I hope to allow other creators to sell their work under. It’s not easy to get your own business started, and if I can help others get started in selling their work, I’d be happy,” West says.

For her facebook page please visit: https://www.facebook.com/ArtfullyArtlessCraft 

Inside A City Of Bridges

Robert Albus, A.K.A. Rob Jungle, A.K.A. A City of Bridges, is a young up-and-coming musical mastermind who dabbles in the indie electronic scene brewing in the cold winter heart of Calgary.

“My name is my music,” says ACOB.

“I am A City Of Bridges,” he adds.

To Rob, music is much more than most of us can comprehend.

“My name is the feeling you get when a song hits you in the feels,” he touches on.

“Maybe that’s a little inexplicable for most to understand, but it’s how I view myself,” he shares.

Rob has become accustomed to the soothing sounds of Fruity Loops Studio (FL) and shares his work throughout the social media scope.

“I make all sorts of electronic music but it’s all some common elements,” he shares.

“I like to use self-recorded sounds of things like twigs breaking, rocks hitting rocks, crunchy leaves and the sort for my percussion. There’s a lot of subtractive synthesis in my work and I’ve been branching into additive synthesis and FM synthesis, he says.

“Convolution reverb is another large theme for A City Of Bridges. Imagine clapping in a parkade: the tail of this reverberation can be processed in such a way that I can place my synthesized and self-recorded sounds into this acoustic space,” he explains.

But how does a musician deal with the task of trying to sort his thought process without interference or distraction from everyone else’s work?

“I listen to little music day to day at the moment. My tastes, however, have been developed over years which have been filled with great periods of active listening (the practice of listening to a piece of music as a sole activity rather than using it accompany other tasks),” he says.

I enjoy everything from big band and swing to acid and improvisational jazz. Anything folky speaks to my heart and reminds me of the fact that I AM nature, not IN nature,” he shares passionately.

“I love to throw my hood up and vibe to hip hop – new school or old school and basically anything bass-heavy in the electronic realm is A-OK to me,” he says.

“But my soul resonates with deep, atmospheric, dubby, grimy, slow jams,” he shares.

“I also like to dance like a motherfu**er so it’s important to know what’s appropriate,” he says.

Rob’s interest in electronic music dates back to the prepubescent ages of every man’s time to grow.

“I started making electronic music when I was in high school,” he says.

“I met a fellow who was a DJ and he taught me a few things. I thought it was fun, but I wanted to create music, not just play it,” he says with soul.

“I spent years learning the art and to this day I am still learning, he adds.

“The key is to do it every single day and allocate the time and money that is needed to do this,” he says.

Rob has been associated under a variety of names, but A City Of Bridges is a creature of a different realm.

“A City Of Bridges started autumn 2012. I went through a rough breakup and lost my mind a little and I went to my home town to see my ailing grandmother in the hospital,” he says.

“This lovely small city is known affectionately as The City Of Bridges. It all came together,” he shares.

“I knew that I had to dedicate myself to my art at a whole new level and in a way that I didn’t know I could previously,” he says.

“Since then, I have had a release, an EP entitled GSD https://soundcloud.com/acityofbridges/sets/gsd,”

A City of Bridges isn’t hitting the breaks anytime soon.

“I have a lead on a label release but it’s all unofficial still,” he says.

“It’d be a first for me and it is certainly the next step in my career,” he adds.

Whether it’s writing music, DJing, or simply finding the time to garden while rocking out to his beats (no pun intended), A City of Bridges will find his place in the modern world.

“Being a performance artist of some sort is a part of where I see my career going, but ultimately I identify as a maker,” he says with ferocity.

“For the time being I make music and coming up soon I will be making performance hardware from recycled and antiquated mediums. Wherever I end up, it will be music and it will be focused on making,” he adds.

“My music is my life and all I really want to see are people feeling what I’m feeling when I write my music,” he says.

“The rest we’ll have to wait and find out,” he shares lastly.

Bless up!

ACO Bridges

For additional coverage, click here:

http://storify.com/Dylan_Streifel/inside-a-city-of-bridges

Downtown Shoot